Tamarind Chutney (LID)

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Tamarind Chutney is a delicious sweet and sour Indian condiment. I especially like it with samosas. There is a good chance you can find a prepared tamarind chutney that is LID-safe at the grocery store in the ethnic aisle. Buy it. That would be so much easier. : )

If you just like to cook and want to try something different, give this recipe a try. It is worth the effort. The tamarind chutney keeps well. Store it in the fridge for up to 3 months. After you are done with LID, Tamarind Chutney is a nice accompaniment to a cheese tray.

Tamarind comes in many forms. Sometimes  you can find the dry pods in Mexican or Indian markets. I have also seen tamarind concentrate. I get “wet” tamarind (from Thailand) at the Asian market. It comes in a solid block. It’s sticky and full of seeds and pod pieces. I use about 1/4 of the package for this recipe (a little over 4 ounces). I cut up the tamarind block so more surface area can be exposed to the hot water.

Wet Tamarind

Tamarind Chutney

4 ounces of wet tamarind, cut into pieces
1 1/2 cups hot water
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 teaspoons garam masala
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (or to taste)
pinch of salt

In a bowl, soak the tamarind in the hot water for 15 minutes. Using a spoon or your hands, break up the tamarind and work as much of the pulp off the seeds and pods as possible. It doesn’t look pretty.

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Pour the mixture through a fine mesh strainer set over another bowl or measuring cup Work the tamarind through the strainer with a spoon or spatula.

Tamarind Sieve

Discard the seeds and pods left in the strainer. You will have about 1 cup of a somewhat thick tamarind liquid.

In a saucepan, combine the tamarind liquid, sugar, spices, and 1/2 cup of water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Simmer gently for 10 to 15 minutes, or until it is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon. The chutney will still be fairly thin, but will thicken slightly when it cools.

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Cilantro Chutney (LID)

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This is an excellent Indian condiment that can be used while on a low iodine diet. It would be perfect as sauce for Trader Joe’s Vegetable Samosas. It is also good as a sauce for grilled chicken.

Samosas

This chutney is versatile too.  You can toss it with hot pasta (or with cold pasta and veggies for a pasta salad) or use it instead of tomato sauce for a pizza topping. You can usse it as a condiment for sandwiches or wraps. It is also wonderful as a marinade for chicken or pork tenderloin. I like making cilantro chutney the day before I want to serve it so that the flavors have time to meld and intensify.

Cilantro Chutney

1 bunch cilantro, washed and dried, most of the bottom stems removed
1 or 2 small green chiles, stems removed, seeded, and cut into chunks
juice of one lemon (or lime)
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 pinch of black pepper
non-iodized salt to taste (not more than 1/2 teaspoon)

Put all the ingredients into a food processor or blender and puree into a paste. Add water, a teaspoon at a time until you get the consistency you want (not too thick, not too thin).

Overnight Oats (LID)

Towards the end of this round of the low iodine diet, I used the last of the So Delicious Coconut Creamer and Trader Joe’s Coconut Creamer to make Overnight Oats. I was really happy with the way they turned out. Creamy and filling, but without an overwhelming coconut flavor. I kept mine fairly simple, only added shredded coconut and pecans.  You can customize you overnight oats however you want them. The sky is the limit. You can also make them ahead of time and keep them in the fridge for up to a week. I would suggest adding the fresh fruit right before eating.

Overnight Oats (LID)

1/2 cup rolled (old-fashioned) oats
LID-safe milk or creamer substitute
sweetener of choice, to taste
1/4 teaspoon vanilla

Combine the oats, dairy substitute, sweetener, and vanilla in a Mason jar. You can include your add-ins now or wait until you are ready to eat your oats. Stir to combine. Place the lid on the Mason jar and store in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Add-Ins
.Nuts and Seeds
-pecans
-sliced almonds
-walnuts
-pistachios
-sunflower seeds
-chia seeds
-pumpkin seeds
-sesame seeds
-flax seeds

.Dried Fruit
-raisins
-cranberries
-coconut
-apricots
-dates

.Spices
-cinnamon
-nutmeg

Fresh Fruit
-pineapple
-berries (strawberries,blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, etc…)
-apples
-bananas
-peaches
-mango
-kiwi
-pumpkin puree

Other Add-Ins
-peanut butter
-cocoa powder

-dairy free chocolate chips (or break up a dark chocolate bar0

Nachos with Black Beans and Veggies (LID)

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Nachos on LID? Yes! With Daiya Shreds, you can create the illusion of cheesiness. In all honestly, they taste nothing like real cheese, but they do melt well and provide a creaminess similar to cheese. Daiya Shreds do not contain dairy, soy, or sea salt. Some of the other Daiya products do contain sea salt, so be careful and read labels.

The addition of beans, sauteed veggies, salsa, and jalapenos to these nachos disguises the fact you are eating vegan cheese and you will momentarily forget you are on a restricted diet.

There are so many possibilities when making nachos. Start with the base of melted Daiya Shreds on tortillas and then add beans, veggies, and toppings to your liking. As long as it’s LID-safe, anything goes.

Nachos with Black Beans and Veggies

Sauteed Veggies
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 bell pepper, seeded and chopped
1 zucchini, chopped
1 cup frozen corn
non-iodized salt (I use Morton’s Coarse Kosher Salt)
black pepper

1 15.5 oz can LID-safe black beans, heated

tortilla chips (Tostitos are LID-safe)
Daiya cheddar style shreds (or mozzarella style)

Possible Toppings
LID-safe salsa (Pace and Tostitos brands are both good)
fresh avocado or avocado cream
pickled jalapenos (or try candied jalapenos) (be careful, I’ve seen canned pickled jalapenos that contain iodized salt)
shredded lettuce
diced tomato
chopped cilantro

To make Sauteed Veggies:  Heat a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the canola oil and heat briefly. Add the chopped onions and cook until they just begin to soften. Add the garlic and cook one minute. Next, add the bell pepper and zucchini. Cook until tender, about 5 minutes. Add the frozen corn and cook until hot. Season the mixture with non-iodized salt and black pepper.

To make nachos:  Evenly spread tortilla chips on a plate. Sprinkle some Diaya Shreds evenly over the chips. Place in the microwave and cook at full power until the Diaya is melted. This took about 50 seconds in my microwave.

Top nachos with drained black beans, and sauteed veggies. Add toppings to your liking.

Corn Salsa (LID)

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Corn Salsa

It won’t be long before I will have to start LID again. I will have another whole body scan in March. Last year was much easier than the year before because I was better prepared. It’s not too early to start compiling recipes.

This colorful salsa, eaten with tortilla chips is a tasty snack while on LID (or any other time, really). It is also a nice addition to tacos, fajitas, or rice bowls. It can even be eaten on its own as a salad of sorts. It keeps well in the fridge for a week or so.

Poblano  chiles (fresh or roasted) can be substituted for the bell pepper and jalapenos.

Corn Salsa

1 pound frozen corn
1/2 large onion, small dice (red onion looks pretty with corn)
1/2 green bell pepper, small dice (you could also use red bell peppers)
2 jalapenos, or to taste, minced
handful fresh cilantro, chopped
juice of 1/2 lime
non-iodized salt (I use Morton’s Coarse Kosher Salt), to taste

Heat a large skillet over high heat. Add the frozen corn and cook, stirring often, until heated through and starting to char. Cooking it this way really brings out the sweetness of the corn. Let the corn cool completely.

Once the corn is cooled, add the remaining ingredients and mix to combine. Taste and add more lime juice or non-iodized salt, if needed.

Samosa Soup (LID)

Samosa Soup

I like Indian food. Samosas, Indian pastries filled with savory ingredients, are a favorite of mine. I have made Samosas filled with spiced potatoes and green peas on numerous occasions. They are a bit time-consuming to make so I do not make them often. I took ingredients found in Samosa filling and turned them into a delicious and easy soup.  This soup is quick enough to make on a weeknight. It is sure to bring a little spice to LID.

Samosa Soup

2 tablespoons canola oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and minced
1 jalapeno, seeded and minced
1 tablespoon salt-free curry powder (store-bought or homemade – recipe at bottom)
dash cayenne pepper (optional)
2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and diced
1/2 cup dried green split peas, picked over and rinsed
8 cups salt-free vegetable broth (I use Rapunzel bouillon cubes and water)
1/2 cup frozen green peas
non-iodized salt (I use Morton’s Coarse Kosher Salt), to taste
1/4 fresh cilantro, chopped

Heat the canola oil in a soup pot over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until soft. Add the garlic, ginger, and jalapenos, and saute one minute more. Add the curry powder, cayenne (if using), green split peas, and vegetable broth. Cook 10 minutes. Add the diced potatoes and continue to cook until the green split peas and potatoes are tender, about 20 more minutes. Add the frozen green pea, season to taste with non-iodized salt, and cook until warmed through, about 5 minutes. Take off the heat, add the cilantro, and serve.

Quick and Easy Salt-Free Madras Curry Powder

3 tablespoons ground turmeric
2 tablespoons ground cumin
2 tablespoons ground coriander
1 tablespoon ground cardamom
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

Combine all of the spices and store in a glass Mason jar.

Mexican Lentil Soup (LID)

Mexican Lentil Soup

I love this time of the year, when summer is changing over to fall. The days are starting to get cooler and the air is a little crisper. The air conditioner is not running non-stop and there is a little chill in the air when you wake up in the morning. It’s a perfect time for soup and this one is wonderful. It is a flavorful and filling soup that comes in at around 76 calories per 1 cup serving.

Soups are perfect to have while on LID. You can make big batches and freeze individual servings. It helps so much to have food prepared ahead of time.

Mexican Lentil Soup

Mexican Lentil Soup

1 tablespoon canola oil
1 onion, diced
2 stalks celery, chopped
2 carrots, peeled and chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 jalapeno, seeded and minced
14.5 ounce can no salt added diced tomatoes (I like to use petite diced)
1/2 cup dried lentils, picked over and rinsed
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
7 cups LID-safe vegetable broth (I use Rapunzel vegetable bouillon)
1 medium zucchini, diced
non-iodized salt (I use Morton’s Coarse Kosher Salt) and pepper, to taste
1/4 cup fresh cilantro leaves, chopped

In a soup pot, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, celery, and carrots. Cook until the vegetables are tender. Add the minced garlic and cook 1 minute longer. Add the jalapeno, diced tomatoes and their juices, dried lentils, cumin, coriander, and vegetable broth. Bring to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes. Add the zucchini and cook until the lentils are tender, 10 to 20 minutes. Season the soup with non-iodized salt and pepper. Stir in the chopped cilantro and serve.

Crockpot Black Bean and Barley Chili with Mushrooms and Kale (LID)

Crockpot Black Bean and Barley Chili with Mushrooms and Kale

This is a little something I cooked up this past winter. With this chili, I set out to make one thing and ended up with something totally different. That is not necessarily a bad thing. I ended up with a nutritious and hearty vegan chili that tasted great and is suitable for LID. I was happy with the results.

Just a little note about chili powder, most contain salt. Most likely, it’s non-iodized salt, but to be safe choose a chili powder that does not contain salt. I get mine from Penzey’s.

Crockpot Black Bean and Barley Chili with Mushrooms and Kale

1 large onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
16 ounces mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
1 14.5 ounce can unsalted black beans, drained
1/2 cup barley
4 cups unsalted vegetable broth (I used 4 cups water and Rapunzel Vegetable Bouillon cubes)
2 tablespoons chili powder (check ingredients, I use Penzey’s brand)
1 teaspoon cumin
non-iodized salt (I use Morton’s Coarse Kosher Salt) and pepper, to taste (I used 1 teaspoon non-iodized salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper)
4 cups kale, chopped

Add all the ingredients to the crockpot. Cook on low for 6 to 8 hours or on high 3 to 4 hours.

Ribollita (Italian Vegetable Soup with Bread) (LID)

Ribollita (LID)

This is one of my favorite soups and it’s perfect for LID. If you can’t find an Italian style bread that is safe for LID, this soup is also good with a little pasta (like ditalini, pastina, or acini di pepe) added around the same time as the zucchini.

I’m pretty sure cannellini beans are safe on LID, but you may substitute chickpeas in the recipe if you are concerned.

This recipes makes a lot of soup, so you will have plenty of leftovers. It’s great to have on hand for a quick lunch or as a nutritious and filling start of a meal. It keeps for a week in the fridge and freezes well. You could make a batch ahead of LID and freeze in individual portions.

Ribollita (Italian Vegetable Soup with Bread)

1/4 cup olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
2 large carrots, peeled and diced
3 stalks celery, diced
4 cloves garlic, minced
8 – 10 cups vegetable broth (I use water and Rapunzel salt free vegetable bouillon)
1 14.5 can of no salt added diced tomatoes & their juices
2 large potatoes, peeled and diced (I use Russet)
1 15.5 ounce can no salt added cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
1/4 head green cabbage (or savoy), cored and thinly sliced
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 zucchini, diced
non-iodized salt (I use Morton’s Coarse Kosher Salt) and black pepper, to taste
Italian bread, sliced

Heat the olive oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onions, carrots, and celery and cook until soft. Add the garlic and cook a minute more.

Add the broth, tomatoes, potatoes, beans, cabbage, thyme, and basil to the soup pot. Increase the heat to medium-high and bring the soup to a boil. Reduce the heat slightly and simmer 15 minutes. Add the zucchini and cook until the zucchini is tender, 5 to 10 minutes. Season to taste with non-iodized salt and black pepper.

To serve, place a slice of Italian bread in a bowl and ladle soup over bread.

Balsamic Vinaigrette (LID)

Balsamic Vinaigrette

This is a super simple Balsamic Vinaigrette recipe. I really like it on mixed greens (like a Spring Mix).  You can elaborate on this dressing, if you wish. Sometimes I’ll add finely minced garlic and/or a dried Italian herb mix.

Balsamic Vinaigrette

2 ounces balsamic vinegar
2 ounces olive oil
1/2 teaspoon non-iodized salt (I use Morton’s Coarse Kosher Salt), or to taste
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/8 teaspoon dry mustard

Combine all the ingredients in a small Mason jar with a lid. Screw on the lid and shake until combined. Store leftover dressing in the refrigerator. Allow to sit out at room temperature a little bit before using again.

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